About Me · Family · Notes from My Readings

My Other Heritage

I read Sue Fishkoff’s Kosher Nation: Why More and More of America’s Food Answers to a Higher Authority.

Personally, the chapter “Got Shrimp?” was informative and resonant for me because it made me realize just how little I know of my traditionally Reform German Jewish heritage.

I know tons about Japan and Japanese stuff–representing my Japanese side. I also know not as much, but a fair bit, about my Lower East Side Orthodox Jewish side–which represents half of my Jewish side, and feel very connected to it. But, I realized reading this particular chapter, “Got Shrimp?,” that I hardly know anything about my traditionally Reform German-Jewish side–the other half of my Jewish side. This suddenly made me feel very weird. I feel like in some ways I have prioritized getting to know the Orthodox side and saw that as more authentic than the Reform side. Weird… While I have the chance, I want to read up a little more on the Reform movement and its history since this too, is my heritage.

 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “My Other Heritage

  1. Hello Kaguya: This time I’ll do my best to not make a fool of myself.
    Your unexplored part of your Jewish heritage is in fact my Jewish heritage – non-Orthodox (Reform) German Judaism. Frankly, I think your decision to remain (or become) Orthodox has been sound – I don’t hold Reform Judaism in high regard. Here’s a link to one of my earliest blog posts in which I attempt to define the term ‘Yeke’ – a colloquialism (or pejorative) for German Jews and their descendants:
    http://schvach.blogspot.com/2007/04/whats-yeke-by-schvach-yid-yekes-are.html

    1. Hi Schvach,

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts with me. Regardless of what I choose to do today though, for me, knowing where my family comes from and what kind of historical currents they have been influenced by is important. At least in my case, a lot of my connection to Judaism is informed by my desire to connect with my family and their heritages, this will always remain important.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s